Charles Stratton

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Main researcher/physician at Vanderbilt University whose fundamental science and research, along with his colleagues, has formulated the combination antibiotic approach to treat Chlamydiae pneumoniae

Continuous Treatment

I haven't blogged my treatment for a while, as I've been waiting to see if I would stick with a shift in protocol. So far, still with it, so thought it might be time to report in and get other's thoughts. New folks, please read this as informational only. It does help clarify Dr. Stratton's use of the continuous rather than pulsed protocol, but the rest of the hypotheses here are presented as my own speculations, not scientific fact.

Going down for the 40th time

Before I submerge too far I thought I would do a short blog on the "feel good" time between my 39th pulse and the one (#40) that I began this morning. The message I want to convey is: it did take the 11 days of recovery but then last Saturday, the 19th day post-pulse, began the best days I have had since 2003 and better than many of 2002. As I hoped for, the rather brutal attack on my hips and knee resolved itself and took that pain and some more brainfog and vanished like morning fog being burned off by the spring sun. It has been a really, really good week with many hours of hard work, which I happily welcome. A second point is that I have been able to extend the time between to 24-25 days. My legs spoke last night but in muted voices - I could barely hear them.

2 1/2 years - now this?

For a very long time I have believed that my post-flagyli was a mirror image ot my pulse. This one, number 39, a REALLY good one, made a fibber out of me. Number 38 was abbreviated to 3 days because we had very special company coming from Canada and I sailed right through it. But I think the last two day's targets were saved up and gunned right down at the very beginning of the next pulse. I hereby pull out Jim's old descriptive word - slammed. This pulse took 11 full recovery days during which every step was agony and attacked with real vengeance in addition to my right hip, my left hip and out of absolutely nowhere, my right knee. Suddenly, in a few hours, it vanished. But now my knee bends when I walk!

Karl's Treatment of MS via Combined Antibiotic Protocol (CAP)

(Editor: Karls rather rapid response to the CAPi is not necessarily typical of MSi patient response. Every patient's response is different. Karl was able to hit the Cpni infection hard and persistently and manage the die-off symptoms adequately in this process. Others must take it much more slowly. His story is inspiring for the persistance it took for him to get adequate treatment, and his thoughtful description of his experience.)

Too many battles, not enough troops

"Veterans" also take "falls", or the plodding two steps ahead and one back , sometimes a big one.  Last weekend both Richard and I got whatever was sweeping through the populace.  He, being a pediatrician, has been exposed to virtually everything and consequently gets almost nothing.  So, when something gets through his defences, it is a good one, and he had already shared it this time.   We both spent two days and more flat.  He is now up and running while I am kind of shuffling along behind.   I debated putting this  "on paper" but felt it should be noted:  in a matter of hours - about one month per hour - I regressed in my abilities, walking, energy, thinking.   It was as though my body had too many battles going on simultaneously and couldn't cope.  So we coddled ourselves, eating exceptionally well, sleeping lots (fortunately Dr. R. was not on call that weekend) and got better, which probably would have happened in any case.  BUT - my walking came back as fast as it left, reaching the point by Tuesday night that we could begin flagyli (just can't get enough torment).   I still have a really bad cough but this has not descended into my chest, which has always happened since I was a kid, certainly with a cold comparable to this.  However, right on schedule, a day or so after the first flagyl, my right hip and knee  began  a giant ache.  This has been the main focus for the last three pulses, having pretty well cleaned up my neck, right shoulder (not QUITE finished there), my lower back and other various lesser targets.  Amazing, all this. 

Rica's Story- She Won't Let Multiple Sclerosis Get Her Goat!

Rica-- known as katman in her www.cpnhelp.org< membership, has been an intrepid user of the CAPi for Chlamydia pneumoniae in treating multiple sclerosisi, well before this website even existed. She finally put together her most impressive story of recovery and we are proud to present it here. You'll find this and more about her journey in her blogs< on this site.
Jim K, editor


In the 28th month of relentless, daily treatment, I feel that I have earned the right to stand at the vantage point of a second or third tier trailblazer.  I stand as Pancho to Don Quixote or Tonto to the Lone Ranger.  There are a couple of operatic characters nibbling at my sub-conscious but you get the point.

Now, I have a very real problem with sharing MY body with all the (bacterial) freeloaders who are doing just that.  I am indignant - I have worked very hard for my place in life and the workplace and when I found that these nasty little devious creatures were stealing my life, I had to fight back.   After spending much too much time in their immediate presence and on their level, I am leaving them behind.

Twenty-eight months - a marker

In the 28th month of relentless, daily treatment, I feel that I have earned the right to stand at the vantage point of a second or third tier trailblazer.  I stand as Pancho to Don Quixote or Tonto to the Lone Ranger.  There are a couple of operatic characters nibbling at my sub-conscious but you get the point.  My first piece of  loud vocalization is as Guner said:  "You may get discouraged, but don't give up".  Jim wished for each of us in his discourse for the new year the stubbornness and long, long vision (and I modestly add: courage) it takes to  do this.  I have a very real problem with sharing MY body with all the freeloaders who are doing just that.  I am indignant - I have worked very hard for my place in life and the workplace and when I found that these nasty little devious creatures were stealing my life, I had to fight back.   After spending much too much time in their immediate presence and on their level, I am leaving them behind.

The Final Chapter - it Never Ends

It was the opinion of our esteemed resident pharmacist who made that remark, which I have incorporated, that this is a life sentence.  We can accept that.  We have learned  to adjust, to be grateful for the chence to do the battle, and to sing the praises of  getting better, which were not chapters in the volume before this someday best seller.

My 36th pulse will begin soon.  I think it won't be the emormous investment of courage and sacrifice of time that it was in the first 25 or so.  My battle will be one of defense, of patrolling the perimeter, so to speak, within a year if I am correct.  My question has become my mantra -  why don't all MSi patients give this "a try" for a year?  There is so much to be regained.

Rica 

P23, P24, Niacin, and Circumin

I am finishing pulse 24-- one more Flagyli to go. Niacin">i and turmeric (herb containing circumin) are definitely kicking it up a notch. No, make that several notches. No real improvement in the gray skin around my eyes and on the backs of my hands; it still reflects my overall energy supply.

I know that I blogged my last pulse as relatively uneventful, but I am getting a longer view now. I have had to lie down twice today because of panted breathing, I can't get warm, the fasciculation is nearly continuous in my thighs, and I am paying the price for my extravagant energy use this morning. (I clipped our Corgi's toenails.)

I am trying to decide whether to back down on the niacin, the turmeric, or the Flagyl. Opinions?

Ron 

blood test result question

I had a 9 on my bun/cr normal is 12-20 can any of you tell me if this is anything to be worried about?

Thanks

lee

Hope, Disbelief and Reality

Having finished 26 months of this sometimes hellish protocol, I have been through the months based only on hope.  Then came the months of disbelief and "I couldn't do that before", about  twenty-three of the two together.  I am now in the reality phase and I love it.

My visit to my doctor was a few weeks ago.  For his benefit and to prove once again to myself that all this was indeed true, I insisted on doing the shin test, the stork test, the feet-together-eyes closed-arms outstretched for 30 seconds (we really need to name that because we are going to need it more and more).  Just as "normal" people could do, I did all with an A+.  I still have trouble getting past 5 seconds standing on my "bad foot" alone, but never did I think I could even stand on that foot at one time, since I couldn't stand on both at the same time without a cane or walker. 

Sarah's Thanksgiving Blog

This is my Thanksgiving day blog.  Today it is three years, three months, three weeks and three days since I first started doxycycline and it is also my birthday.  It is due to the team researching CPni at Vanderbilt University Medical Centre that I reached this birthday, so I give them my heartfelt thanks, especially Chuck Stratton and Ram Sriram, who willingly offered us so much help in the early days. There is much about those very early days that I don't remember clearly so it was lucky I had David to make sure that I took the antibioticsi in the morning and then again in the evening when he got home from work. Of course, by no means all of you will be as bad as I was when I first started, but a supporting partner or friend is invaluable nonetheless. 
I have been extraordinarily busy over the last few months and have made many strides in many different directions.  The summer here, until August, was extraordinarily hot so I haven't made that many strides as far as walking distance goes, but one thing that both David and I have noticed is the way I walk.  My stride used to be long and smooth.  Wearing the right shoes I could creep up on people and take them unawares but of recent years I have tended to shake the house to its foundations just walking across my studio, just one floor up.  Now though, for short periods I have regained my old walk.  I think this is as important as the distance walked because he more awkward the walk the more tired you are at the end of it.  I know that at the start of the summer I managed to walk nearly four miles, but that should only have taken not much more than an hour.  Luckily I wasn't wearing a watch and I left my phone at home, but it must have taken nearly four times that and the next day I felt so stiff.  The more I can walk the way I use to, the less I will jar all my completely unarthritic joints.  I need to work up a bit more speed as well, so that my family are again begging me to slow down because they can't keep up with me.

Walking aside, my painting also continues to improve as I get even more used to my new medium.  I do still wish that acrylics didn't dry so quickly though.  Apart from my "Isola dei Pioppi" http://www.cpnhelp.org/?q=competition_time#comment-7758< I had one more painting left unfinished before I began the Queen Mary 2 paintings and then ended up not able to do anything.  I have called it "Temple Window."  It is based on a high window in the Protestant Temple in Nîmes, which I saw from  hotel room several years ago.  You could see right through to the other side of the building and I remember imagining what all the mysterious shapes in between were.  I must say I took some liberties with the colour of the frame, because in real life, all the paint has been weathered off.  However, windows are a building's eyes and my eyes are blue:

Major Post-Pulse Slam, And Some Useful Understanding

In my last blog I reported that, despite having had increasingly mild pulses, this last (21st) pulse was surprisingly painful and fatiguing. I speculated that it might be due to the addition of Rifampin having some kind of synergistic effect, or perhaps creating more cryptic Cpni to kill.

Last night, my second night post-pulse, I had the biggest post-pulse "slam" I've ever experienced: sudden and severe irritability, red and burning eyes, acute mid-back muscle spasm and pain, a surge of all-over inflammationi. My irritability was way off the charts, and to I had the good judgement to decline to have any important conversations or make any decisions last night! All I could do was sit against a heating pad for my back, take sleep meds and ibuprophen, and hope. This morning, although I was very loggy at first, I felt much better with glucose and 2000mg Emergen-C, especially better as the day went on. What on earth was that?

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