Charles Stratton

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Main researcher/physician at Vanderbilt University whose fundamental science and research, along with his colleagues, has formulated the combination antibiotic approach to treat Chlamydiae pneumoniae

The disappearing lesion

Since the early seventies, I have been able to make my body go numb. The first times I fell because I didn't know what was coming. I have been able to do this at will for many years, but took care not to fall down. Fortunately, the feeling always returned.

As stubbornness is the nature of us on this site, I have only listened to Richard in the last six or so months when he admonished me not to do that! I can also dislocate my hip but he says not to do that either! (Takes all the fun out of life - no?) (No)

So - what IS the point - simply put: the ability is gone. I cannot do it anymore AT ALL. Not even a tingle and certainly no numbness. Yes, the quiet improvements continue - and the energy is very, very nearly back to my norm or 55 years. Keep at it - it pays.

Chronicles of a Rifampinaut: Pulse 27, onward!

I began pulse 27 this morning with some nervousness since I still haven't fully recovered from pulse 26 back in August. I  decided that 60 days was enough time to recover, that any longer would increase the risk of making the pulse even worse then it may be.  So, here I am toda, pulsing away.

My doc and I agreed back in June to increae the dosage of Flagyli from the prevous 3x375mg/day x 5 days to 3x500mg/day x 5 days.  I suspect that had something to do with making pulse 26 that much harder although I pulsed in July with much less negative impact.  Pulse 26 just picked me up and cast me down, no other way to describe it.  Still haven't recoverd entirely from it.

The calm before the gathering storm....

Here today on October 6 and I look ahead to October 18 when I will be embarking on pulse 27.  That sounds so calm when I'm anything but calm about it.  Pulse 26 took me from being ambulatory to having to use a wheelchair and/or walker.  It wasn't something I was expecting to happen, it was pulse 26.  I had pulsed for over 2 years and yes, I had a little bit of heat and heaviness in my legs but by and large was able to get around and be fully functional through pulses.  Pulse 26 was far different.

The Unbroken Circle or: It's the Rifampin, Stupid

Last month I added Rifampin to my arsenal again, after taking it twice a day for sixteen months and stopping it in Jan., 06. A few things have happened since I started Rifampin a few weeks ago. I decided I should set them to paper while I am lucid (so to speak).

Chronicles of a Rifampinaut: the war continues at Pulse 26

On the eve of pulse 26, I can't help but reflect on some things that people here as well as in my day-to-day life have suggested to me.  The suggestions have been good, considerate ones, and I recognize that; however, I have decided not to take the suggestions, at least not yet.

What suggestions am I referring to?  I'm referring to the suggestion that I get a cane or a walker.  I refuse, outright, until I have no other choice.  And despite the hell I put myself through, I have a choice, and I choose to fight.

Antibiotics to be available without prescription

This is the news:  In England, possible antibioticsi to be sold over the counter, to treat CHLAMYDIA!

This is the story form http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/06/health<

Oral antibiotics are to be made available for the first time without doctor's prescription under guidelines approved yesterday by the medicines regulator.

A pill to treat chlamydia, the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection, will become available for purchase in pharmacies across England later this year.

The bugs' long-overdue deaths

The title was suggested by a conversation between two of our most battle-hardened warriors, and I couldn't resist it. This has been one of the most eventful years of my life - busy, too. Beginning in January with surgery and moving through kidding season, then a very, very good show season, this last taking a temporary break after the best Nationals in years, then linear classification of our goats, now a break for the really bad August heat (this is AFTER the really bad July heat), then a resumption of show season next month, which wil begin my fifth year of MSi treatment.

Chronicles of a Rifampinaut: stayin' alive on pulse 25

Day 3 of pulse 25 is well underway.  Over the weekend, I had two days of taking the higher dose of Metronidazolei and it continues today with 3 x 500mg, this time in pill form as opposed to the capsule form.  I can now say from first hand experience, there is a major difference between taking the capsule form and taking the pill form.  The pill form is NASTY.  Horrid, horrid taste!

I've started attempting to toss the pill back in my mouth to my throat in hopes of missing my tongue entirely and washing the bugger down.  Uggh!!  I had it easy with the capsule form!  Unfortunately, when my doc increased my dosage, he also increased the amount of pill prescribed so that I get a 4  month supply at a time.  Now, all in pill form....yuck!

Chronicles of a Rifampinaut: Pulse 24

Day 2 of pulse 24.  Nothing remarkable to report, the pulse is going much the same as most of  my prior pulses have gone.  I have a bit of heaviness and burning in my legs but otherwise feel about the same as I did before the pulse.  This being the second day, that could easily change come Monday when the work week begins again, as does my work schedule.

I stopped INHi about three weeks ago and have been having less inflammationi.  What I had before made it really difficult to function on some days, I just wasn't able to get around the way I was before INH and since getting off of it.  I think the combination of abxi was just too much.  I even did two pulses while on continuous INH.  Better to scale back a bit.

post pulse 23

Okay, I finished my 23rd pulse on Friday and then just did the regular daily medications over the weekend.  Perhaps I should say regular weekend medications as my last dose of azithromycin was Friday.  In any case, I thought I would recap some things I noticed during the pulse and things I've noticed over the weekend.

What I've noticed is not any improvements in my symptoms...unless you consider having more pain and discomfort an improvement.  Pain...that's a relative term.  It's more like inflamation and soreness then pain per se.  Hard to describe how it feels but I think many of you know what I'm referring to - a hotness in one's extremities (my legs mostly). 

Chronicles of a Rifampinaut: the Seventh Inning Stretch

Yes, it has been seven months since I began taking Rifampin although it seems more like eight.  It's entirely possible my count is off, it's not terribly important that it would be off by one.  In any case, I'm now on the most intensive CAPi I've ever been on.  I'm now taking Doxyi, Azi, INH, Flagyli, and Rifampin, along with NACi all at the same time this week.  I started my 23rd pulse on Sunday night, a day and a half later then I generally try to schedule the start day/time (Saturday mornings).

Biaxin and doxy same time together - interfering with calcium pyruvate?

Hi to all!

I got the biaxin receipt yesterday from my doc and start with it! Instead of Azi.

Do you all take the biaxin and the doxyi<i< at the same time together?

And below is the product I ordered.

Is calcium pyruvate the right one? There are other pyruvates as well.

new treatment question

I am switching to the new protocol. I read where it says to check the titres for cpni in the blood. My husband and I tested positive he for iggi and igm me for just igm. I don't understand how you can use this as a guideline. I never test positive unless it is after a pulse. Dr. W also states that negative titres mean little. Any help here?

Emerging Stratton Protocol 4/2008: a new approach to an old set of problems

Emerging Stratton Protocol 4/2008: a new approach to an old set of problems

Reported by Jim K

A Young Woman Comes Back to Life: Zdenicka's Story

Zdenicka, as you will see, is a spirited, passionate and stubborn young woman. Her story is very heartening to read, and she holds nothing back in speaking of the trials of dealing with standardized medical treatment with a non-standard condition and protocol. Fortunately, her father Coufal was an early member here and started the Czech version of Cpnhelp, so she had an avenue to find her own help. I've left her very thorough description as she has written it, an amazing job for a non-native English speaker, so that I don't sully the pure charm in her rendition. (Jim K, Editor)

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