INH

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Isoniazid- niacin related compound used to treat tuberculosis, found by Stratton et al to have powerful antichlamydial effect.

Kissing Your Sister

During 2008 I did so many pulses while I was traveling that doing the last one at home seemed to be missing something.

Anyway, pulse #16 completed.

Have a Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays and Joyous New Year.

 

Does PrimaCare count as an Emergency Room?

Ended up at Primacare the other night.  I was lifting my wife's uncle's Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC - bet most here don't recall what that was) footlocker when the handle broke and it landed on my left foot.  The bruising and swelling looked a lot like a similar break a few years ago so I hobbled into Primacare; a local "doc in a box" that I knew from past experience had an x-ray machine.  Turns out that I had not broken the foot.

The worst part of it is that I can't blame any of this on the reaction to the last pulse since the aftermath has been completely unremarkable.

Fifteen down - and how many to go?

Fifteenth pulse completed today. 

Overall, had the same experience as the last few pulses of getting "supercharged" after starting the flagyli.  Also, had very severe shortness of breath a couple of times reminiscent of my experience in Chicago.  If I had not already had the experience of making a trip to the Emergency Room in Chicago last year, I would have probably ended up going to check out what the E.R. looked like a Houston's Memorial Herrman hospital.  I've heard its a good one.  Anyway, the dyspnea passed and I'm now just waiting for the endotoxinsi to hit.

I also have to remember to keep it a secret from my son that flagyl turns the color of urine orange since that's his favorite color.  

 

 

Short of breath in Toledo

A week after pulse #14 completed and I was in Toledo when I started having shortness of breath problems just like those that sent me to the hospital back in September 2007 (see prior blog posts for all the gory details). 

Since I knew that this was probably just a visit from Dame Endotoxini the Mistress of Misery, I just upped my charcoal intake and made sure I didn't miss any WelChol tablets and it has pretty much cleared up on its own.

Guess this means I'm killing something.  Can't wait for November to start pulse #15.

INH with flagyl

Well im taking 10 day pulses of Flaygl. I thought it over and im going to add INH to my pulse and feedback would be appreciated thanks

Pulsus Interruptus

Was well into pulse #14 when I got side-lined by a stomach bug that went through town.  I couldn't keep anything down for 36 hours.  While it's not fun being sick on the road it does have at least one benefit - since most hotels use either a boiler or tankless system, I didn't have to worry about running out of hot water when I took 45 minute showers to try and calm down the body aches.  As soon as my stomach calmed down, I did resume the antibioticsi so hopefully there was no harm done (except to the bugs).

Does Oklahoma City even have Emergency Rooms?

You wouldn't know it by me. 

Three days post-pulse #13 and only mild reactions (mostly slight shortness of breath during stressful parts of the negotiations and the familiar "cog fog") so far.  

By the way, Oklahoma City is a real nice city.  The Murrah Building Memorial affected me more than I thought it would.  I think it was the small chairs that represented the children killed in the day care center that made it so emotional.

Lightly Hammered

Thirteenth pulse of metronidazolei (1,500 mg/day) plus Isoniazid (300 mg/day) completed today.  Since about pulse seven I've felt "energized" during the pulse and have had little post-pulse reaction.  This pulse was different with reaction (lethargy, confusion, pain in various areas) starting two days into the pulse.  I'll keep you posted on the post-pulse reaction.

Cautiously conceding I may have been right...

When I was in surveying class, the instructor described the process that one should follow as: "We complete the field work, take our measurements, do the computations and then try everything we can think of to prove ourselves WRONG.  Failing that, we cautiously concede we may be right."

I don't know that I've done everything to prove myself wrong, but I'm going to cautiously concede that the decison to add the amoxicillini was right. 

Following my own advice - sort of

I have blogged several times suggesting that people (like me) who are doing the CAPi on their own stick religiously to one of the protocolsi until they had enough experience with it to know how they were going to react and thus have a "baseline" for comparison with any changes that they make. 

I have followed this advice for a year through 12 flagyli pulses.  Having lamented about the fact that I was not getting the kind of reaction to the later pulses that I got to the earlier ones, I decided to make a change.  Knowing the NACi and Amoxicillini had the same effect on CPni Elementary Bodies, but that Amoxicillin was also effective against other pathogens that might be co-infectionsi, I decided to add Amoxicillin to my antibioticsi.  

All Multi-Factored Up

As I'm in experimental mode a lot with the CAPi, I don't report in often on my own protocol. This is partly because I like to wait a bit longer to see how things play out before posting observations. And partly so that people new to the CAP don't get confused that these experiments of mine are any kind of example! So here's the warning: this is not intended for anyone new to the CAP, and is not a model of anything anyone here should follow! As you will see, I'm not always the best example to follow anyway.

Nothing Fancy This Time

Pulse Number 12 completed on August 28, 2008 and I didn't get a chance to find out what any of the Emergency Rooms looked like.  I'll report more on the die-off aftermath when and if there is anything to report, but so far it has been unremarkable.

 

With Apologies to Willie Nelson

On the road again

Just can't wait to get on the road again

The life I love is doin' Flagyli in strange towns

And I can't wait to get on the road again.

Pulse #12 beckons.  In Houston this time. 

 

Antibiotics to be available without prescription

This is the news:  In England, possible antibioticsi to be sold over the counter, to treat CHLAMYDIA!

This is the story form http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2008/aug/06/health<

Oral antibiotics are to be made available for the first time without doctor's prescription under guidelines approved yesterday by the medicines regulator.

A pill to treat chlamydia, the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection, will become available for purchase in pharmacies across England later this year.

If you think its monotonous to read this....

Pulse #11 completed August 1, 2008. 
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