Birdcage Walk, Clifton

Birdcage Walk, Clifton

There, this is how you do it: the image is taken from my PC and the walker looks rather like me.  I used to live just around the corner but left when I was three so it must be someone else...............................Sarah

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Oh, I love this place!     Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MSi in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

A glorious image, Sarah. I love it!

Neuroi symptoms & many health problems from 1989. NACi+all supps(04/11) CAPi(05/11)

Lovely pic Sarah! A "poetic/romantic" one

 

It''s the fog!  When I was little I used to look dwn on the acual city of Bristol and it could be completely shrouded in mist but we up on the hill were above it.  Sometimes, though, it gets everywhere!................................Sarah

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MSi in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

not working for me here - just get URL box no upload... but carry on like a flock of chickens all cackle together and peck at the outside chicken until you kill it go on you know you can 

Started NACi Sept'14... 100mg Doxyi Dec'14...  Roxi 13Dec '14 Supplementsi...

Hint: you have to start a new post for it but urls are not involved: my picture is just a picture stored on my PC.........Sarah 

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MSi in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

Sarah, check email.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

Hi!

Look, start a new post by clicking image on the left hand side.  Click "Browes". Find and select your picture from your hard drive.  Add a bit of text in the box.  Click "Preview" if OK, click "Save".

As stated elswhere, a Dropbox link may well work out better all round for everybody.

Undecided

G.

“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln<

Cackling Chickens?

 

If you want my story as a medical student in a mental hospital; I’ll try to post it tomorrow. It's quite amazing.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension">i (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazolei. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

Those of us still awake at this stupidly late hour will hit the pillow tonight waiting for tomorrow's amazing story!

Surprised

G.

“Don't believe everything you read on the internet.”

―    Abraham Lincoln<

I used to have the same experience looking at NYC from a distant mountain I had climbed; except it was smog, not fog.

PPMSi-misdiagnosed 2001-diagnosed 2006. Probably caught cpni in birth canal but it didn't pass BBBi until my 40s. Minocycline 7 mos.- resulting bronchitis 5 months.Go to private m.d. out-of-plan. Wheldon CAPi 3/2/07 Stopped 12/12; resumed 12/13

I suppose ours was smog as well but you don't think of that when  you are three: you just look down on the city only about a mile or two away and see it all hidden in a 'white' mist. It looked magical.

Completed Stratton/Wheldon regime for aggressive secondary progressive MSi in June 2007, after four years, three of which intermittent.   Still improving bit by bit and no relapses since finishing treatment.

The Mental Hospital

 

Here is a link to a page of short stories: http://www.davidwheldon.co.uk/short_stories.html<   . The Mental Hospital is a story in pdf format. The direct link appears in the second volume: http://www.davidwheldon.co.uk/mental_hospital.pdf<  

 

It is the account of a medical student’s time studying psychiatry while living in the hospital. It’s factually fairly accurate. Even then I wondered whether chronic mental disorders had an infective input. Now this seems to be the case, though barely acknowledged. There are subtle changes to the hippocampi in schizophrenia, and Brian Balin has demonstrated that these delicate areas of the brain carry a heavy load of Chl. pneumoniae in Alzheimer’s disease. A few years before I retired from the NHS I set up a simple algorithm for testing bloods of persons for Cpni-specific IgAi. We found high titres in a number of persons with organic brain disease and paranoid psychoses.

 

Only read it if you have time, though.

 

I loved Birdcage Walk in Clifton. A nearby church, Saint Andrew's, was the first casualty of the heavy raids on Bristol in the War.

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension">i (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazolei. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

As I've previously read it, let me recommend that everyone find a few minutes to read it.  It's very evocative and you feel like you're there, in the midst of the place, as you read on.  It's a good work, David.

The difference between what we do and what we are capable of doing would suffice to solve most of the world’s problems. Mohandas Gandhi

Hi David,

Here's something about "P.A.N.D.A.S" -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PANDAS<

My family had a several repeating rounds of Strep Throat when my boys were young.  The Doctor would treat each individually until I insisted on treating us all at once.  It was a Strep Throat "merry go-round."

Shortly after that - my middle son's mental health disorders worsened dramatically.  He was even forced into an institution for some time - it was that serious.  Of course, back then, I had never heard of PANDAS or CPNi.

I'm convinced that what you mentioned about mental health having an "infective input" is true.  My middle son, in my opinion, is a "PANDAS" survivor.  He still exhibits relatively serious mental health issues, including paranoia and delusional thinking, though things have improved somewhat.  He is a bright and sincere though frequently delusional and paranoid and angry young man.

I wonder what kind of a man he would have been had that not happened, as he is very bright otherwise. He can't get along with anyone for any significant amount of time still - preventing him from being able to hold a job.  I wonder what kind of a man Rick may have been without the scourge of MSi.  He is struggling mightily - and I am hoping and praying that we have found a viable treatment for him.  Initial signs are encouraging, but it will be nice to see more decisive and definitive indications.

The struggles of my middle son with his mental health issues likely cause by PANDAS and what Rick is still struggling with has colored my kids lives and my life.  It's why I keep searching for answers - for instance the recent stuff about Vitamin D3 - and it's antibiotic properties.  I wonder if Johnson & Johnson hadn't been so persuasive with their sun-screen products - if my children would have had some additional protection against those maladies. 

In the US - many of the folks in our jail and prison systems are said to suffer from minor mental illnesses.  I  wonder how many of them may be caused by an infective agent.

I will read your story later this weekend.

Best & Highest Regards,

Tom C

Proud Parent of Rick - R started CAPi in Nov. 13. Small measurable improvements as of 7/14, more by 10/14.  Holding Steady in early 2017.  "I will leave no stone unturned, no theory unexamined, to help my son." Tommi

Interesting story DW thankyou for the link

Started NACi Sept'14... 100mg Doxyi Dec'14...  Roxi 13Dec '14 Supplementsi...

dreamy picture

poignant story beautifuly written

thank you for sharing

Mia

Interesting story.  At least it is when one knows that it's basically accurate.  I can't resist quoting Macaulay on this:

"A fiction may give a more impressive effect to what is already known; but it can teach nothing new.  If it presents to us characters and trains of events to which our experience furnishes us with nothing similar, instead of deriving instruction from it, we pronounce it unnatural.  We do not form our opinions from it; but we try it by our preconceived opinions.  Fiction, therefore, is essentially imitative.  Its merit consists in its resemblance to a model with which we are already familiar, or to which at least we can instantly refer.  Hence it is that the anecdotes which interest us most strongly in authentic narrative are offensive when introduced into novels..."

I appreciate your thoughtful mention of Macaulay. Reportage is always erroneous. How could it be otherwise? What was seen was admitted to the mind, and so is no longer pristine in recall. The mind deceives, embellishes. And, if the story is retold, it must be told an a language communally understood. And so events that were seen to happen — and the senses are not above error — always partake of fiction. What a world we inhabit!

D W - [Myalgia and hypertension">i (typically 155/95.) Began (2003) taking doxycycline and macrolide and later adding metronidazolei. No medication now. Morning BP typically 110/75]

Well, some reportage is better than others, and I doubt you have any reason to be ashamed of your own.  In any case, I'm not sure if my meaning got through, as I may have abbreviated that quote too much.  It's just that if I'd read that story as a pure work of fiction, as something someone just dreamed up from thin air, I wouldn't have known what to make of it, and certainly wouldn't have given it any weight as a statement about medicine.  So it's a shame that readers outside this discussion perceive it as a work of fiction.

Likely you had good professional reasons for not publishing it as fact, but accounts that are far stranger and more impressionistic have been published as memoirs, and well received.  This one comes to mind, for instance:

http://books.google.com/books?id=yj6-bQk0MwUC&pg=PA89&lpg=PA89&dq=black+pig<

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